Does it spark joy?

Barry’s Tele Vue collection with Tele Vue eyepieces and mounts (L-to-R): Brass Ranger with 10.5mm Plössl on Executive Mount, Pronto with 21m Plössl on Telepod mount, Oracle with 19mm Wide Field eyepiece on Panoramic mount, Tele Vue-85 with 20mm Plössl on non-Tele Vue equatorial mount, and Brass Renaissance with 55mm Plössl on a Gibraltar Mount. Image © Barry Kawa with all rights reserved.

Tidying means taking each item in your hand, asking yourself whether it sparks joy, and deciding on this basis whether or not to keep it. Marie Kondō, Japanese organising consultant and author

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Look Back: NEAIC, NEAF, & Apollo 11mm

In case you missed it: our flickr album has images from the Apollo 11mm “Magic Moment” and the Northeast Astronomy Forum 2019.
Just two weeks ago and a day ago we were  scrambling to get the banner and handout literature ready for the Tele Vue Apollo 11mm eyepiece reveal at the Northeast Astronomy Forum (NEAF) show. At the same time, our imaging equipment was being gathered, transported, and setup for the Northeast Astro-Imaging Conference (NEAIC) that would begin the next day. Additionally, products not being shown at NEAIC were cleaned and collected for the NEAF show commencing that weekend. Plus, we’d inspected and boxed hundreds of eyepieces, Barlows, Powermates, and Paracorrs for our Cosmetic Sale at NEAF. All NEAF items had to be transported and setup on Friday afternoon at Rockland Community College, along with the NEAIC gear brought over when that show ended. We had our work cut out for us that week!

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Tele Vue’s Secret Launch: Apollo 11mm Eyepiece!

Tele Vue President David Nagler grinning  ear-to-ear over the Apollo 11 eyepiece.
A package arrived at Tele Vue’s door on the Monday before the 2019 Northeast Astronomy Forum (NEAF). It was quickly ushered into the corner office where a small group gathered around the parcel. When opened, three black boxes were withdrawn. For the first time, after many months of development in secret, each black box was opened by a member of the design team. At Tele Vue, we call these internal product reveals a “magic moment” —  when  fresh prototypes are unboxed in the office for “first light.” This was a “magic moment” unlike any other; one 50-years in the making. The Apollo 11mm commemorative eyepiece had landed!  

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Tele Vue at NEAIC!

Updated 4/4/2019 1:23 PM

NASA astronaut Donald Pettit (Space Shuttle / ISS / Spacewalker) speaking with Tele Vue Optics President David Nagler today at the 2019 Northeast Astro Imaging Conference (NEAIC). He is at the conference to discuss imaging from the ISS.

The Northeast Astro-Imaging Conference (NEAIC) kicks off today and Tele Vue is there. NEAIC runs April 4 & 5, 2019 and is located at the Crowne Plaza Conference Center, Suffern, New York — only 30 miles north of Manhattan.

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NEAF: Tele Vue’s Cosmetic Sale is Back!

NorthEast Astronomy Forum
Saturnday, April 6, 8:30 am — 6:00 pm
Sunday April 7, 10:00 am — 5:00 pm
SUNY Rockland Community College Field House
145 College Road, Suffern, NY 10901
 

It has been 9-years since our last sale of cosmetic product at NEAF. This year we will have limited quantities of new in box, cosmetic-blem, Tele Vue eyepieces, Powermates™, Barlows, and Paracorr coma correctors at VERY SPECIAL, SHOW-ONLY pricing at our Booth #522. All products include original eyeguards and lens caps.

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Keep Calm …. !

April 6 & 7, 2019
SUNY Rockland Community College
Suffern, NY
 
Here at Tele Vue headquarters, eyepieces, scopes, accessories, tools, literature, and banners are coming off the shelves and being boxed up. It looks like we’re moving. Are we? No, it’s just that we’re getting ready for the annual Northeast Astronomy Forum (NEAF) in Suffern, NY. All the aforementioned activity here is because we bring everything to this yearly event. After all, NEAF is the billed as the “World’s Largest Astronomy & Space Expo.” Over the course of two days, thousands of visitors will descend on the Field House at SUNY Rockland Community College (RCC) in Suffern,  to see, handle, and maybe buy just about every astronomical product on the market today — all under one roof.
 

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Of the Moon and Messier Marathon

Composite image of Messier Marathon Checklist over Messier Object images. Messier objects by Michael A. PhillipsCC BY 4.0, Link

Beginning amateur astronomers soon encounter the term “Messier objects.” They learn that this is a list of objects outside our Solar System that are visible through small telescopes. This list was originally compiled by Charles Messier, in the 18th century, from his observations and those of contributors. The catalog has been updated over time, as recently as the mid-20th century, to 110 objects in total.  

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NP127is: Imaging the Skies Over Taos, NM

NGC7000 North America Nebula-NP127is by AstroBin user Jerry Macon. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Tele Vue-NP127is flat-field, APO refractor with ZWO ASI128MC Pro full-frame color CMOS camera with 2″ Astronomik L-2 UV-IR Block filter. Exposure 59 x 240″ for a total of 3.9-hours. Mount:Paramount MEII with Absolute Encoders. Software:Sequence Generator Pro, PixInsight 1.8.

We’ve noticed some nice full-color and RGB  deep-sky images made by Jerry Macon using our Tele Vue-NP127is telescope. They’re all taken from his private Dark Star Observatory in Taos, New Mexico.  His image of the expansive North America Nebula (NGC 7000 – above) displays how the deep red light of Hydrogen-α dominates this emission nebula (an  ionized cloud of hydrogen gas about 3° across). A feature of this nebula is the “Cygnus Wall” section at the bottom, that includes “Mexico” and “Central America.” This feature is a dense star-forming region of dust and gas that is often imaged alone without the rest of the nebula. 

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The Sun from Sunny Barcelona, Spain

protuberancias y superficie solares – 18/11/2017 by flickr user Jordi Sesé. All rights reserved. Used by permission. In this impressive image, a massive solar prominence erupts above the limb of the Sun. Furry spicules are visible along the entire edge of the disk. The roiling surface appearance of the Sun is caused by filaments and fibrils (prominence and spicules away from the limb — see blog text for details). All these solar features are usually invisible in ordinary white light. These phenomena are only revealed through narrow-band hydrogen-α light filters. Tele Vue 2.5x Powermate™ into ZWO ASI174MM monochrome camera using 100mm f/10 achromatic scope with modified Coronado PST Hα and BF10 blocking filter.

If you’re suffering from the cold northern winter like we are at Tele Vue headquarters in upstate New York, you’ll instantly be “warmed” by these “hot” solar images made by Jordi Sesé Puértolas from his balcony in Barcelona, Spain. These photos appear to show a blazing inferno on the “surface” of the Sun. However, science tells us this is not fire we are seeing but hot plasma (ionized gas) and gas in the wavelength of Hydrogen-α light.

Night Vision in the UK: Seize the Night!

This week’s guest blog post is written by Gavin Orpin. The blog came about as a result of a discussion between Gavin and Tele Vue President David Nagler at the recent AstroFest 2019 show held at the Kensington Conference and Events Centre in London.

The constellation Orion over the roof, image by Gavin Orpin. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Taken through a night vision monocular with a smartphone using the Tele Vue / TNVC FoneMate adapter. An astounding view of Barnard’s Loop (the 10-degree wide nebula arc from above the belt of Orion to the feet) — that normally requires long-exposure imaging to record. Gavin tells us that his images simulate the naked-eye view through the night vision monocular. Huawei P20 Pro phone took the image. Exposure notes: 4mm lens at f/1.6, 20-sec exposure at ISO 100.
March 1, 2019 Update: Filter Magic Coming Soon!

Coming from the U.K., using night vision for astronomy is very rare due to the cost and difficulty of getting the night vision equipment. I estimate there are only around 6 night vision astro users in the whole of the U.K..  However, I was fortunate in that one of my local astronomy club members is the leading U.K. proponent of night vision astronomy, so I was able to see first-hand this technology in action.

[Night Vision] has given me a completely new aspect of the hobby to explore.

Given the significant light pollution, living near central London does create some big issues for visual astronomy. However, night vision has given me the ability to observe DSOs (Deep Sky Objects) with my Tele Vue-85 APO telescope that I would have no chance with normal glass eyepieces. It has given me a completely new aspect of the hobby to explore — for that I am very grateful to my astro club friend and Tele Vue for making it possible for a U.K. based astronomer. In addition, when I do get the chance to visit a dark site, the night vision works even better and I can see things I never dreamed of when I began observing the stars.

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