Subject: 10715 NAGLER (1983 RL4)

What does the surface of asteroid 10715 Nagler look like? Asteroid Eros (NEAR Shoemaker mission image above) may have originated in the same Maria group of asteroids as 10715 Nagler. (NASA-JPL)

We’d like to share with you this nice letter Al received from Roger Harvey recently.

From: Roger Harvey
To: Al Nagler
Subject: 10715 NAGLER (1983 RL4)

Hi Al,

We first met at the Wildacres Retreat, North Carolina mountains, this past April. Despite our lengthy conversation that I will always remember, you never mentioned that you were honored with asteroid 10715 Nagler (1983 RL4).

As luck would have it, my primary effort in amateur astronomy the past 40+ years has been visually identifying asteroids by their position, magnitude, and motion against the background star field.

My observing session for August 16, 2017 happened to include 10715. I saw it at 3:54, 4:32, and 6:28 UT retrograding southwestward in Aquarius at magnitude 16.3. This was ~0.5 magnitude fainter than advertised…not uncommon with higher numbered asteroids. In doing so it was my 5900th asteroid.

My scope is a Lockwood 32” f/4 which (of course!) I couple with your Paracorr Type 1. The 5.5 mm eyepiece yields 676X which is my usual choice. Several times I’ve had to go to 1352X for very faint targets requiring a darker field. Obviously such an effort would be impossible without the excellent optical train above.

Again, it was great speaking with you on the phone today! I am so glad you got a kick out of your asteroid actually being seen by a human (read eyeball, not CCD) (:>). Your joy made my day as well.

Roger Harvey

Continue reading “Subject: 10715 NAGLER (1983 RL4)”

Tele Vue TV-60 is Not Just for the Birds

We are proud of the SmartMoney Award the TV-60- received upon its introduction.

This is the counterpoint to our Tele Vue is for the Birds blog post this past spring. Yes, you’ll find that the TV-60 is a great grab’n go astro scope too! 

Our award winning, high performance, super-compact Tele Vue-60 is worth considering for those looking for a super-portable APO refractor. It fills many niches including travel, super-finder, day/night scope, and is a great telephoto.

It accomplishes all this APO-goodness in a very small 60mm, f/6 form-factor: just 10″ long without diagonal!

Tele Vue TV-60 is a 60mm, f/6 APO with 4.3° field of view (32mm Plössl).

Continue reading “Tele Vue TV-60 is Not Just for the Birds”

2017 Eclipse: Naglers in Nashville, TN!

Observers point at first contact in front of the Tele Vue tent. David Nagler is third from left in green.

If ever there was an event that bound together every living thing on this planet, the disappearance of the Sun during broad daylight reminds us of just how reliant, fragile and connected we are. To be able to share the emotions of that special moment with others reminds us that all the moments we share are special.

Continue reading “2017 Eclipse: Naglers in Nashville, TN!

Tele Vue-NP127is: Imaging the Skies Over Europe

From a small town in Germany, two hours drive away from the Alps, Panagiotis Xipteras images the sky with his Tele Vue-NP127is. We noticed his exquisite images on social media and asked him why he choose the NP127is for his imaging scope. He tells us below.

M33 The Triangulum Galaxy” (cropped) by astrophotographer Panagiotis Xipteras. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Exposures: Hα: 5×600″, RGB: 3×300″ each through Tele Vue-NP127is.

Continue reading “Tele Vue-NP127is: Imaging the Skies Over Europe”

2017 Eclipse — the View of a Lifetime! (with the TV-NP101)

Line forms around Al Nagler and his TV-NP101 with Tele Vue FoneMate smartphone adapter. People can see the eclipse on the smartphone screen. Judi is on the right in green. Image by Mike Kaisersatt.

Tele Vue telescopes spread out along the center-line of the Monday, August 21, 2017 North American Eclipse. Our employees and friends report on their eclipse experiences. Our second report is from Al Nagler’s totality trip to Columbia, SC.

A year ago, Judi (wife and Tele Vue co-founder 40 years ago) planned this eclipse trip, our 4th. I decided, agreeing with Neil deGrasse Tyson’s recommendation, to concentrate on the unforgettable visual experience of totality. Boy was he right!

We reserved rooms at the Hilton Embassy in Columbia, SC and drove there starting on Saturn-Day (pardon my passion for changing the name) August 19th, arriving on Sunday afternoon to meet-up with our good friends Gail and Matt Cowit to share the experience. I immediately found a good parking spot with my car trunk facing a large open area and nearby trees for shade benefit :-).

Continue reading “2017 Eclipse — the View of a Lifetime! (with the TV-NP101)”

Neptune Opposition: Sept. 5, 2017

Neptune image by Voyager 2 probe. NASA/JPL

Tonight Neptune rises opposite the sun and is closest to earth. Being in the sky all-night, and at it’s brightest, presents a good opportunity to sight this rarely-seen telescopic planet. Unlike the other planets, you’ll have to crank-up the power to make sure you’ve really found it. Even at 100x it just looks like a magnitude 7.8 star. So don’t expect to see a Voyager 2 quality image through your eyepiece. Continue reading “Neptune Opposition: Sept. 5, 2017”

Totality in Tellico Plains, TN with Tele Vue TV-85

Tele Vue TV-85 image from Tellico Plains, TN 21 Aug 2017. Yellow Sun emerges after 3rd contact. Red prominences dance along the solar limb — something you’d normally need a hydrogen-alpha filter to view. Image by Peter Carboni.

Tele Vue telescopes spread out along the center-line of the Monday, August 21, 2017 North American Eclipse. Our employees and friends report on their eclipse experiences. Our first report is from Peter Carboni, our webmaster and social media blogger. He followed the weather trend before selecting his center-line observing location just 4-days before the event!

After driving 14-hrs Sunday, from the Hudson Valley of NY to a hotel outside of Knoxville, I awoke at 3 a.m. Monday morning for the final 90-min journey to my observing site. At 6 a.m. I arrived in Tellico Plains, Tennessee — population 941 — a farming community in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains that abutted the Cherokee National Forest. It was also near the center-line of the eclipse and promised about 2’ 37” of totality.

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Great American Solar Eclipse Today!

TV-85 image of Total Solar Eclipse of Aug. 2008 in China. Image by Dennis di Cicco / Sean Walker.

Today is the day we’ve been waiting for!  Your local media will have published event times, public viewing locations, weather, and information on how to safely view the event — so get out there and experience the event if you can!

Post images made with Tele Vue products (scopes, FoneMate™, Powermates™, flatteners, reducers, eyepieces, etc.) to social media with #televue40 and we’ll link to the best of them.

The following links will help you enjoy the show! Clear skies! Continue reading “Great American Solar Eclipse Today!”

Countdown: Total Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017

Tele Vue President David Nagler exiting our building with all his eclipse observing gear in hand.

The media frenzy is growing as the first total solar eclipse to cross the North American continent in decades is closing in on us.

Our Tele Vue President David Nagler likes to travel light. So he built his eclipse observing kit around the Tele Vue TV-60 and Tele Vue Tele-Pod mount. In fact, he’s shown in the image here with not one but two complete telescope setups with a selection of eyepieces and solar viewers. Here’s a complete list of what he is carrying:

Continue reading “Countdown: Total Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017”