Totality in Tellico Plains, TN with Tele Vue TV-85

Tele Vue TV-85 image from Tellico Plains, TN 21 Aug 2017. Yellow Sun emerges after 3rd contact. Red prominences dance along the solar limb — something you’d normally need a hydrogen-alpha filter to view. Image by Peter Carboni.

Tele Vue telescopes spread out along the center-line of the Monday, August 21, 2017 North American Eclipse. Our employees and friends report on their eclipse experiences. Our first report is from Peter Carboni, our webmaster and social media blogger. He followed the weather trend before selecting his center-line observing location just 4-days before the event!

After driving 14-hrs Sunday, from the Hudson Valley of NY to a hotel outside of Knoxville, I awoke at 3 a.m. Monday morning for the final 90-min journey to my observing site. At 6 a.m. I arrived in Tellico Plains, Tennessee — population 941 — a farming community in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains that abutted the Cherokee National Forest. It was also near the center-line of the eclipse and promised about 2’ 37” of totality.

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Great American Solar Eclipse Today!

TV-85 image of Total Solar Eclipse of Aug. 2008 in China. Image by Dennis di Cicco / Sean Walker.

Today is the day we’ve been waiting for!  Your local media will have published event times, public viewing locations, weather, and information on how to safely view the event — so get out there and experience the event if you can!

Post images made with Tele Vue products (scopes, FoneMate™, Powermates™, flatteners, reducers, eyepieces, etc.) to social media with #televue40 and we’ll link to the best of them.

The following links will help you enjoy the show! Clear skies! Continue reading “Great American Solar Eclipse Today!”

Countdown: Total Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017

Tele Vue President David Nagler exiting our building with all his eclipse observing gear in hand.

The media frenzy is growing as the first total solar eclipse to cross the North American continent in decades is closing in on us.

Our Tele Vue President David Nagler likes to travel light. So he built his eclipse observing kit around the Tele Vue TV-60 and Tele Vue Tele-Pod mount. In fact, he’s shown in the image here with not one but two complete telescope setups with a selection of eyepieces and solar viewers. Here’s a complete list of what he is carrying:

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August 21, 2017 Solar Eclipse: Inside the SOLAR LAB

Hydrogen-α image of sun and scopes inside the Solar Lab. Copyright Stephen Pizzo.

We recently received an interesting letter from Stephen Pizzo, discussing his solar imaging work with Tele Vue Powermate™ amplifiers. Most of the time (90%), he uses our 4x Powermate™ on a Hydrogen-α scope — either a LS152THA (900mm focal length) or LS230THa (1,600mm focal length). This extends the effective focal length of these dedicated solar scopes to 3,600mm or 6,400mm for breathtaking, close-up images of the activity on the Sun’s chromosphere. The choice of scope depends on the seeing conditions. If conditions won’t support the 4x, Stephen employs our 2x Powermate™ with the LS230THa for an effective focal length of 3,200mm. Stephen also notes that he normally uses 3″ to 4″ of extension between the 4x Powermate™ and the imager to get another 0.5x of magnification. The imager itself is very unique: a RED Dragon Epic monochrome 18-megapixel camera — a camera usually associated with the world of professional digital cinema.

He shared the images created with the bigger scope and 4x Powermate™ with us. As you can see below, they are spectacular!

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Partial Lunar Eclipse – August 7, 2017

Xavier Dequevy’s Total Lunar Eclipse composite image of March 03, 2007 made with the TV-NP101is. Note that the Aug. 7, 2017 eclipse will be partial.

Some phase of this lunar eclipse is visible from the eastern tip of South America to Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania.  All phases are visible in the region encompassing east Africa, Central Asia, and most of Australia. This means most of the Americas will not see this event. (Don’t fret! Our consolation prize will be the total solar eclipse in just two weeks after!) The eclipse is “partial” because the moon just clips the deepest part of the Earth’s shadows — the “umbra”.

Eclipse map courtesy of Fred Espenak, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, from eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.

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