Northeast Astronomy Forum (NEAF) 2017 Roundup

Al Nagler with night vision demo.

The harsh snows of late-winter in the Northeast may have put a damper on some amateur astronomy activity this year. But with the arrival of spring, amateur astronomers in the region were jolted into activity by the appearance of the Northeast Astronomy Forum (NEAF) – just 30-minutes north of New York City. Hosted annually by the Rockland Astronomy Club at Rockland Community College, it is billed as the “World’s Largest Astronomy & Space Expo”. This spring-weekend show features presentations by world-class astronomers and scientists, astronomy outreach groups, kids activities, a big solar star party, and over 100 vendors and exhibitors. With the biggest collection of telescope equipment manufacturers and vendors under one roof, it’s Tele Vue’s biggest event and we bring all our scopes, eyepieces, and accessories every year. Continue reading “Northeast Astronomy Forum (NEAF) 2017 Roundup”

Jupiter Opposition: April 7, 2017

Jupiter with 2x Powermate™
Full-size image includes Io and Callisto.
©Russell Croman

Tonight Jupiter is closest to the earth and rises as the sun sets — the planet is in opposition. This will place it in the sky all night long. As the nights warm up into the spring, you’ll enjoy great views of this gas giant planet. Some of the best planetary images are made at opportunities like this. Continue reading “Jupiter Opposition: April 7, 2017”

See Tele Vue at 2017 All Arizona Messier Marathon

This March 25/26th Tele Vue will again visit the All Arizona Messier Marathon — 2-hours west of Phoenix, AZ. Look for John Rhodes at the Tele Vue banner. Did you know about the loaner program? John can loan you Tele Vue equipment to use for the night. It’s the ultimate try-before-you-buy experience! Continue reading “See Tele Vue at 2017 All Arizona Messier Marathon”

Comet 2P/Encke’s Blaze of Glory

After being photographed at the end of February, showing off 3 green tails, comet 2P/Encke prepares for the final act of this apparition: a week-long plunge through the stars of Pisces toward the western horizon and perihelion. At the end of February the comet had brightened to almost 8th magnitude. Encke’s orbit this week takes it between the earth and sun — which will cause it to reach peak brightness and then disappear from sight . Use the horizon diagrams here to help you spot it. Continue reading “Comet 2P/Encke’s Blaze of Glory”

Tele Vue: What’s in a Name?

Where does the name Tele Vue come from? Just look at the initials: TV. Al Nagler’s initial products were television projector lenses. These lenses were placed in front of your television to project an enlarged image on a screen. That was “big screen TV” in 1977! However, Al also wanted a name that would be appropriate if he ever entered the amateur astronomy market.   Continue reading “Tele Vue: What’s in a Name?”

Al’s First “Space Walk Experience” — in the News

Al Nagler’s posting last week (Winter Star Party 2017: in the Eye of “Kermitis”) described his experience designing the optical system for the visual infinity display simulator used by the Apollo astronauts to land the “LEM” on the moon.  Through a long-term loan from the Smithsonian, the Tech Works! technology museum in Binghamton, NY, has obtained parts of LEM simulator and asked Al to consult on its restoration. Continue reading “Al’s First “Space Walk Experience” — in the News”