Gene’s Tele Vue Baseball Cap

Dave Skitt (left) and Al Nagler (right) with Gene’s cap at September 2019 NJAA Open House in High Bridge, New Jersey. Photo provided by Dave Skitt.

Travel far among the stars, Gene. We’ve got your cap.

Dear Al Nagler:

You may recall, I met you in September 2019 at the New Jersey Astronomical Association (NJAA) Open House in High Bridge, New Jersey. There, I had you sign a Tele Vue baseball cap for me. That was a very special moment for me, and for the cap’s former owner, who would have been thrilled to meet you. You see, the cap has a particularly interesting history.

The cap belonged to my dear friend and astronomy mentor, Gene Ramsey, who had passed away just three years before. Gene loved astronomy, acquiring his first telescope as a young man. He continued the hobby through his years in the Air Force, where he served until 1962. Upon retiring in the 1990’s, Gene joined the Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton (AAAP). It is there where my wife, Jennifer, and I meet Gene in 2012.

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Clyde Bone’s Tele Vue-140 Re-Built!

Yes, the above scope *is* a Tele Vue: this 700mm, f/5, “TeleVue-140″ scope debuted in 1996 and incorporated our patented 4-element Nagler-Petzval layout in a 5.5”-class Rich Field refractor. To this day the Tele Vue-140 is the largest diameter, fastest focal ratio, Nagler-Petzval refractor we’ve ever made.

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2020: Solar & Lunar Phenomena Overview + Space Junk Podcast

Our FoneMate is excellent for capturing lunar and solar (with a filter) phenomena.

Lunar Eclipses
This year we are blessed by not one, not two, not three, but four penumbral lunar eclipses! (At most there can be five lunar eclipses in a year.) However, none will be dramatic: a penumbral eclipse has the Moon passing through the edges of Earth’s shadow and darkening only slightly. Most people won’t even notice the darkening taking place. There will be no dramatic “bite” taken out of the Moon and it won’t turn the color of “blood”.

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2020 Product Anniversaries

1977: Introducing Tele Vue!
Plössls – 40 years

The year 2020 holds some big product anniversaries for our company. Tele Vue was founded in 1977 by Al Nagler, originally to sell his television projection lenses (hence the name “Tele Vue” to match the abbreviation “TV” — read “Tele Vue: What’s in a Name?” blog post). In 1980 Al introduced Tele Vue to the amateur astronomy market with its inaugural range of four Plössl eyepieces (26mm, 17mm, 10.4mm, and 7.4mm). Additional models followed over the years until the final five focal lengths were released 25-years ago (1995).

Richard Berry published the first review of Tele Vue Plössls in the August 1981 issue of Astronomy magazine. Tele Vue printed the complete review in our ad in the October 1981 issue of Sky & Telescope!
The original Plossl line was expanded and Nagler eyepieces took top billing at the time this advert was published in the Feb. 1982 issue of Sky & Telescope.

Nagler – 40 years

With the positive reception of the Plössl eyepieces (hailed as “the sharpest I’ve ever used” by Astronomy editor Richard Berry) Al Nagler had the confidence to then bring to market his ground-breaking 82° Nagler eyepiece. This eyepiece used principles from Al’s work a decade earlier on an optical probe for an aircraft landing simulator. So began the era of “spacewalk” viewing forty years ago. (See slide show in “I Thank My Lucky Stars!” blog post.)

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Apollo 11mm Commemorative Now Shipping!

Tele Vue CEO Al Nagler with Apollo 11mm eyepiece and his Alan Bean, (4th Man to Walk on the Moon) autographed print.
Just in time for the holidays: the Tele Vue Apollo 11mm collectible eyepiece is now shipping!
 
When you receive your Tele Vue Apollo 11mm eyepiece, please post a photo on social media and tag it:
 
#televue #apollo11

 
In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing, Tele Vue is proud to celebrate our founder’s contribution to the greater effort that made the mission possible and ultimately successful. The special, limited edition commemorative Tele Vue Apollo 11mm eyepiece pays tribute to the simulator program that was invaluable to astronaut training and to the direct influence it had on the eyepieces we enjoy today. We have developed unique packaging for the Apollo 11 eyepiece that consists of a high quality, presentation box with a message from Al and a serialized commemorative medallion matching the serialized eyepiece.
 

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Tele Vue’s Year End: Behind the Scenes!

As we close-out the year, we’d like to update you on what is going on “behind the scenes” at Tele Vue! From the arrival of the Apollo 11mm eyepieces to the ongoing GoodBuy 2019 Sale, and answering your questions in between, our employees in upstate New York are somewhat like Santa’s “elves” this time of year!

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Tele Vue-60: post-Hurricane Restoration

“40 Hours of Terror” is how a Washington Post correspondent described Hurricane Dorian’s impact on the Bahamas this past September. The category 5 storm lashed at the islands with 185-mph (295-km/h) winds (tying a record) and relentlessly drove water and debris over land to cause loss of life and $7-billion in property damage. So thorough was the devastation, that recovery efforts are expected to take many years.

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Your 2019 Mercury Transit Images!

Mercury Transit 2019-11-11 Time 10-03-50-0631 by flickr user Photon_chaser. Copyright Frank Tornyai. Mercury is about to leave the face of our Sun. Hα image through Wollensak 153/1200 achromat using Quark Chromo with Tele Vue 4x Powermate™ using Lunt double stacked etalons, and ASI174 mono camera. Software used was Genika Astro capture, PIPP, AS!3 , Images Plus and Photoshop.

Images from the 2019 Mercury Transit made with Tele Vue gear have now been posted to social media. We present here the best (with permission) and note that Tele Vue Powermate™ amplifiers “shone” in the creation of most.  Not only does Powermate™ help fast, modern scopes achieve a focal length suitable for imaging the tiny planet, but some high-end, drawtube-side, narrow-band filters requires a Powermate’s telecentric operation to create parallel rays for best image contrast. (See Daystar application of Rear-Mounted Filter page).

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November 11th Mercury Transit Countdown!

From Tele Vue’s patio, the Mercury Transit of May 9, 2016 was imaged in white light with our FoneMate™ adapter using a Samsung Galaxy Note 4 attached to an 18.2mm DeLite eyepiece and Tele Vue-76 scope. Mercury is in the lower-right quadrant and forms a diagonal line with sunspot regions 2542 and 2543 as it passed nearest to the center of the solar disk. Mercury was 12-arcseconds in diameter then and will be just 10-arcseconds for the November 2019 transit. Photo by Jon Betancourt.
It was Johannes Kepler (of “Kepler’s Laws of Planetary Motion” fame) that first predicted transits of Mercury over the face of the Sun. He predicted the May 1607 event and November 1631 event. However, nobody knew how big (or small) Mercury would appear against the Sun, leading Kepler to misidentify a sunspot as the planet when he observed the the first prediction. Kepler was deceased by the time of the second event, but a French astronomer confirmed the transit took place.
 
The next Mercury Transit is set for 4-days from now: November 11, 2019. This blog will tell you all you need to know to view and image this rare sight!
 

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