The Passing of Alan Bean, 4th Man to Walk on the Moon

At Stellafane 2009 Alan Bean (left) shakes hand with Al Nagler (right).

From New York Times OBITUARIES

Alan Bean, who became the fourth man to walk on the moon and turned to painting years later to tell the story of NASA’s Apollo missions as they began receding into history, died on Saturday at Houston Methodist Hospital. He was 86.

His death was announced by his family in a statement released by NASA.

Mr. Bean stepped onto the lunar surface preceded by Pete Conrad, the mission commander of their Apollo 12 flight, in November 1969, four months after Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first lunar explorers.

— Goldstein, R. (2018, May 26) Alan Bean, 4th Person to Walk on the Moon, Dies at 86. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/26/obituaries/alan-bean-astronaut-dies.html

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Dr. Bruns at NEAF 2018

David Nagler, Dr. Bruns, the NP101is used for the experiment, and Al Nagler.

We were honored that Northeast Astronomy Forum (NEAF) speaker Dr. Donald Bruns was able to visit in our booth over the two days of NEAF 2018.

Saturday, April 21, at noon, Dr. Bruns stepped onto main stage at NEAF in front of a standing room only audience. His talk was titled: Einstein was Right! Completing the 1919 Relativity Experiment at the 2017 Solar Eclipse.  Over the better part of an hour he explained how Einstein’s General Theory  of relativity predicted the bending of light in gravitational fields and how astronomers have attempted to photograph stars near the eclipsed sun to verify the theory.

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Subject: 10715 NAGLER (1983 RL4)

What does the surface of asteroid 10715 Nagler look like? Asteroid Eros (NEAR Shoemaker mission image above) may have originated in the same Maria group of asteroids as 10715 Nagler. (NASA-JPL)

We’d like to share with you this nice letter Al received from Roger Harvey recently.

From: Roger Harvey
To: Al Nagler
Subject: 10715 NAGLER (1983 RL4)

Hi Al,

We first met at the Wildacres Retreat, North Carolina mountains, this past April. Despite our lengthy conversation that I will always remember, you never mentioned that you were honored with asteroid 10715 Nagler (1983 RL4).

As luck would have it, my primary effort in amateur astronomy the past 40+ years has been visually identifying asteroids by their position, magnitude, and motion against the background star field.

My observing session for August 16, 2017 happened to include 10715. I saw it at 3:54, 4:32, and 6:28 UT retrograding southwestward in Aquarius at magnitude 16.3. This was ~0.5 magnitude fainter than advertised…not uncommon with higher numbered asteroids. In doing so it was my 5900th asteroid.

My scope is a Lockwood 32” f/4 which (of course!) I couple with your Paracorr Type 1. The 5.5 mm eyepiece yields 676X which is my usual choice. Several times I’ve had to go to 1352X for very faint targets requiring a darker field. Obviously such an effort would be impossible without the excellent optical train above.

Again, it was great speaking with you on the phone today! I am so glad you got a kick out of your asteroid actually being seen by a human (read eyeball, not CCD) (:>). Your joy made my day as well.

Roger Harvey

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2017 Eclipse — the View of a Lifetime! (with the TV-NP101)

Line forms around Al Nagler and his TV-NP101 with Tele Vue FoneMate smartphone adapter. People can see the eclipse on the smartphone screen. Judi is on the right in green. Image by Mike Kaisersatt.

Tele Vue telescopes spread out along the center-line of the Monday, August 21, 2017 North American Eclipse. Our employees and friends report on their eclipse experiences. Our second report is from Al Nagler’s totality trip to Columbia, SC.

A year ago, Judi (wife and Tele Vue co-founder 40 years ago) planned this eclipse trip, our 4th. I decided, agreeing with Neil deGrasse Tyson’s recommendation, to concentrate on the unforgettable visual experience of totality. Boy was he right!

We reserved rooms at the Hilton Embassy in Columbia, SC and drove there starting on Saturn-Day (pardon my passion for changing the name) August 19th, arriving on Sunday afternoon to meet-up with our good friends Gail and Matt Cowit to share the experience. I immediately found a good parking spot with my car trunk facing a large open area and nearby trees for shade benefit :-).

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Al Nagler Attends SSAC 2017

Judi & Al at 2017 SSAC (©Ivester)

Judi and I were honored to fill in for a guest speaker unable to attend the Southern Star Astronomy Convention. It was a long but interesting drive to Wildacres Retreat, a magnificent resort used by the Charlotte Amateur Astronomers Club for 30-years. Located near the Blue Ridge Parkway and the town of Little Switzerland in North Carolina, we met a great entourage of fellow enthusiasts over a short stay to give two talks: the opening conferences talk on Thursday evening, April 27, and a talk the next morning. Continue reading “Al Nagler Attends SSAC 2017”