2018: Solar and Lunar Phenomena Overview

Sun setting while partially eclipsed on May 20, 2012 during an Annular Solar Eclipse. Taken through Tele Vue-TV-76 with Canon 50D camera. Credit & copyright Edward Nash.
Solar Eclipses
First, some bad-news for all those newly confirmed “eclipse chasers” from the Great American Eclipse in 2017: there will be no total  solar or annular eclipses this year — just some partials.
Southern hemisphere observers will get a double-dose of partial eclipses starting February 15th. That event will cover an area from the southern part of South America to a large chunk of Antarctica. This will be followed by another partial event July 13th — mostly observable in the  waters between Antarctica and Australia — with the shadow making landfall in the southern parts of Victoria and South Australia.

Continue reading “2018: Solar and Lunar Phenomena Overview”

Great American Solar Eclipse Today!

TV-85 image of Total Solar Eclipse of Aug. 2008 in China. Image by Dennis di Cicco / Sean Walker.

Today is the day we’ve been waiting for!  Your local media will have published event times, public viewing locations, weather, and information on how to safely view the event — so get out there and experience the event if you can!

Post images made with Tele Vue products (scopes, FoneMate™, Powermates™, flatteners, reducers, eyepieces, etc.) to social media with #televue40 and we’ll link to the best of them.

The following links will help you enjoy the show! Clear skies! Continue reading “Great American Solar Eclipse Today!”

Countdown: Total Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017

Tele Vue President David Nagler exiting our building with all his eclipse observing gear in hand.

The media frenzy is growing as the first total solar eclipse to cross the North American continent in decades is closing in on us.

Our Tele Vue President David Nagler likes to travel light. So he built his eclipse observing kit around the Tele Vue TV-60 and Tele Vue Tele-Pod mount. In fact, he’s shown in the image here with not one but two complete telescope setups with a selection of eyepieces and solar viewers. Here’s a complete list of what he is carrying:

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Tele Vue TV-NP101is Relativity Experiment Update

TV-85 image of Solar Flare during 2008 eclipse in China by D. di Cicco.

Optical physicist Dr. Don Bruns recently updated Tele Vue on his preparation for measuring star deflections near the sun during August’s total solar eclipse. As explained on our March 21st blog post (“Tele Vue NP101is to Test Einstein’s General Relativity”), when first measured at the 1919 total solar eclipse, the deflections confirmed Einstein’s general theory of relativity (and made Einstein a household name). Over the years though, the accuracy of the 1919 experiment has been called into question and subsequent visual light attempts during eclipses has not been “stellar”. According to Dr. Bruns, “astronomers last repeated the experiment in 1973, achieving an error of 11%”. This time around he hopes to achieve an accuracy of 1% using readily available amateur equipment. Instead of hauling a big 16” diameter refractor to the eclipse site – as in the 1919 experiment – he’ll be using a much more compact Tele Vue NP-101is telescope. Continue reading “Tele Vue TV-NP101is Relativity Experiment Update”

Tele Vue NP101is to Test Einstein’s General Relativity

NP127fli
Tele Vue NP127fli astrograph with FLI ProLine Camera on Paramount MyT with SkyX mount.

The Tele Vue NP-101is was selected for an historic project by Dr. Don Bruns: to repeat the 1919 experiment of measuring star deflections during a solar eclipse that confirmed Einstein’s theory of Relativity.

The experiment will take place for the August 2017 solar eclipse, with Don using the NP-101is and FLI Microline 8051 CCD camera mounted on a Software Bisque MyT Paramount and field tripod.
Continue reading “Tele Vue NP101is to Test Einstein’s General Relativity”