NP101: Imaging the Skies Over Colorado & New Product!

Horsehead and Flame Nebulae in Hα by SmugMug user Steven Schlagel. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Imaging details: the Tele Vue-NP101 APO (Nagler-Petzval) refractor (101mm, f/5.4) with a Nikon 810Da camera and narrowband Hydrogen-alpha filter were used to create this image. Exposure time was 3-hours total.

The above portrait of the Horsehead and Flame nebulae is stunning.  Created in Hydrogen-alpha light, this monochrome image is filled with wispy tendrils, puffy molecular clouds, dark lanes, and glowing gas. It really brings out the interplay of shockwaves and ionizing radiation at work in this region of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. 

You can compare this image with the color one below of the same region. The red hues are dramatic, but we lose a sense of the “sculpting” that is taking place in the gas and dust. 

Horsehead and Flame Nebulae by SmugMug user Steven Schlagel. All rights reserved. Used by permission. Imaging details: the Tele Vue-NP101 APO (Nagler-Petzval) refractor (101mm, f/5.4) with a Nikon D810a DSLR camera for 6-hours.

The Horsehead (Barnard 33) and Flame Nebulae (NGC 2024) are separated by the bright blue supergiant star Alnitak (center-left in the above image), the easternmost star in the “Belt”  of constellation Orion. Like a giant neon sign, the “Flame”, below Alnitak in the image, is “lit up” by ultraviolet light from the star. The flame-like appearance is enhanced by dark “branches” of light-absorbing gas in the nebula. As for the Horsehead, its appearance is due to the three-star system Sigma Orionis “above” the “horse” (bright star along a line through the horse’s neck and head). It causes hydrogen gas to glow behind a dark concentration of dust that has the distinctive appearance of a horse’s head. 

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TELE VUE SCIENTIFIC PART 1
Doing Science with Tele Vue Optics

Tele Vue Optics’ science goes from solar to polar. Mosaic image adopted from ASTEP study by Crouzet et al. and PUNCH website. Images copyright their respective owners.

Tele Vue’s product quality, consistency, and reliability are well known in amateur astronomy circles. So, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that our top-tier optical performance also attracts the interest of professional astronomers looking for “off-the-shelf” solutions for their experimental needs. Tele Vue also provides researchers with the in-depth technical analysis necessary to determine if product integration is feasible or if custom solutions are required.

In this multi-part blog post we’ll explore some of the published science using our standard gear and take a look at a future science mission that called for a custom designed Tele Vue lens. Note that all the studies in the series, except the last one in this part, were produced with products bought off-the-shelf, same as you would receive from Tele Vue.

Continue reading “TELE VUE SCIENTIFIC PART 1
Doing Science with Tele Vue Optics”